11.16.2012

Black Girls' Night Out: Granger and Kopelson

Sometimes I wonder why I even bother.  *rubs temples*

CW, lemme tell you, I'm not liking this.  Let's go over it again, shall we?

The point of having a lesbian main character on a show is to explore her life and flesh her out as a person...you know...like you would a hetero.

Therefore, she is not meant to simply be the black best friend a sounding board for her hetero "BFF".  She's not a shoulder for the requisite vanilla protagonist to cry on, babbling about her uninteresting, stereotypical, already-done-to-death hetero problems.

Just so we're clear.

As you may have guessed from the opening, this last episode really annoyed the shit out of me.  I got this miserable feeling that the writers are suddenly at a loss with Dr. Tyra Granger, and have Absolutely No Clue where to go with her.

But with the other Negress - the heterosexual one? - they made all sorts of progress (if you can call it that) and gave her all kinds of screen time (go figure).

Dr. Cassandra Kopelson, the Wicked Bitch of the West Wing, choked on her first surgery and now is doing damn near anything to impress the attending.  Including get over on Emily by any means necessary.

Which is the usual, of course.  That's no shocker, but what stood out to me in this episode was that a furious Emily asks, "Are you that threatened by me?"

To which Cassandra replies immediately, "It's not all about you.  This is the real world."

And that's when Cassandra clicked for me.  She's not "after" Emily because Emily is Emily, she's after Emily because that's her stiffest competition for coveted a research position.  One which she is willing to go after by any means necessary.

Tormenting Emily is simply a bonus, and speaking of tormenting Emily:



By the way, just when I was beginning to feel the CW was totally worthless, I noticed a fairly decent increase in POC on this show, both recurring and guest.

The guest who caught my eye?  Dejan Loyola as "Sushil."


Say it with me, ladies: "Damn."

6 comments:

  1. IF "Emily Owens, M.D." is not cancelled soon, I think that the show will explore Tyra's character more. She still has the huge reveal about her father having an affair with the nurse she likes. It's just that the show is focusing more on the Cassandra-Will-Emily triangle right now.

    Because Emily is shown in every scene, it's hard to show many different storylines outside of her.

    Cassandra is very competitive. She and Emily have been shown as being the smartest interns. Cassandra wants to be THE top intern and earn the coveted research assistant position. As such, she will do whatever she has to in order to best Emily.

    The guy was cute. I like how diverse this show is. The OBGYN who Micah is dating is Asian and "pretty" as Emily said.

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  2. Oh, and "It's all about you. This is the real world."

    ...is the realest statement I've heard emitted by a sistah to a WW on TV yet. So if she has to resort to subterfuge to get over on dishwater Emily, then so be it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That really caught my attention. Black women often feel as though we're expected to be nurturing and selfless and quiet in a corner while other people have a life. Um...no. Cassandra's going to have a good career. And she's going to date a good-looking doctor.

      Calling her a bitch, complaining about her tactics, and what have you, aren't going to change that.

      Delete
  3. I got this miserable feeling that the writers are suddenly at a loss with Dr. Tyra Granger, and have Absolutely No Clue where to go with her.

    Which is insane, because why wouldn't they? She's a lesbian, not an alien. Writing about her life shouldn't be any different from any other person. These writers obviously attended the Stephanie Meyer school of writing.

    ReplyDelete

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